It’s said that we learn better way when we observe something in front of our eyes. Sometimes movies teach things in a better way. How many times have you tried to learn about marketing and yet failed?

This time we have got a solution for you people. We list for you some movies that are all about sales, marketing, and business. If you haven’t watched them yet, go ahead and give it a chance to understand much more about the marketing world.

1. Sweet November

Nelson Moss meets Sara Deever, a woman very different from anyone he has met before. His ignorance leads to her failing her driving test. She beguiles him and continually asks him to spend a month with her on the promise that she will change his life for the better. On the first night of November, after Nelson is fired and dumped on the same day, she sleeps with him, and the next day Chaz, a close friend of Sara’s, arrives and refers to Nelson as Sara’s “November”.

2. Boiler Room

In 1999, Seth Davis (Ribisi), a 19-year-old Queens College dropout, runs an unlicensed casino in his home near the campus, catering to college students. Although he earns a successful living, he is a disappointment to his father, Marty (Rifkin), a New York City federal judge. One night, his cousin Adam (Kennedy) stops by the casino to play blackjack, bringing a rich associate named Greg Weinstein (Katt) along with him. Greg recruits Seth to join J.T. Marlin, a brokerage firm based somewhere off the Long Island Expressway, promising him that he has the opportunity to get rich.

3. Wall Street

In 1985, Bud Fox is a junior stockbroker at Jackson Steinem & Co. in New York City. He wants to work with his hero, Gordon Gekko, a legendary Wall Street player. After calling Gekko’s office 59 days in a row trying to land an appointment, Bud visits Gekko on his birthday with a box of Gekko’s favorite, contraband Cuban cigars. Impressed at his boldness, Gekko grants Bud an interview. Bud pitches him stocks, but Gekko is unimpressed. Desperate, Bud provides him some inside information about Bluestar Airlines, which he has learned in a casual conversation with his father, Carl, leader of the company’s maintenance workers union. Intrigued, Gekko tells Bud he will think about it. A dejected Bud returns to his office. However, Gekko places an order for Bluestar stock and becomes one of Bud’s clients. Gekko gives Bud some capital to manage, but the other stocks Bud selects lose money.

4. 12 Angry Men

In a New York County Courthouse, the judge is instructing a jury who are to deliberate the case of an 18-year-old male from a slum who is on trial for allegedly stabbing his father to death. If there is any reasonable doubt, they are to return a verdict of not guilty. If found guilty, he will receive a death sentence.

5. Death Of A Salesman

Death of a Salesman is a 1949 play written by American playwright Arthur Miller. It won the 1949 Pulitzer Prize for Drama and Tony Award for Best Play. The play premiered on Broadway in February 1949, running for 742 performances, and has been revived on Broadway four times, winning three Tony Awards for Best Revival. It is widely considered to be one of the greatest plays of the 20th century.

6. Tommy Boy

After seven years at college, Thomas R. “Tommy” Callahan III barely graduates from Marquette University and returns to his hometown of Sandusky, Ohio. His father, industrialist and widower Thomas R. “Big Tom” Callahan, Jr., gives him an executive job at the family’s auto parts plant, Callahan Auto. In addition to the new job and office, Big Tom reveals that he plans to marry Beverly Barrish-Burns, a woman he had met at a fat farm, and that her son Paul will become Tommy’s new stepbrother. At the wedding, Big Tom suddenly dies of a heart attack. After the funeral, doubting the future of the company without Big Tom, the bank reneges on promises of a loan for a new brake pad division and seeks immediate payment of Callahan Auto’s debts. Ray Zalinsky, owner and operator of rival automotive parts company Zalinsky Auto Parts in Chicago, offers to buy them out while the company’s shares are high, but Tommy suggests a deal: he will let the bank hold his inherited shares and house in exchange for helping to sell the new brake pads. The bank agrees, but they also want the company to prove it still has viability by selling 500,000 brake pads. If they fail, the bank will foreclose, but if they succeed, the bank will underwrite Big Tom’s brake pad venture. Tommy volunteers to go on a cross-country sales trip with his father’s sycophantic assistant, Richard Hayden, a childhood acquaintance who has a particularly antagonistic relationship with Tommy.

7. Glengarry Glen Ross

The film depicts two days in the lives of four real estate salesmen who are supplied with leads: the names and phone numbers of prospects; they use deceitful and dubious tactics to make sales. Many of the leads rationed out by the office manager lack either the money or the desire to actually invest in land.

8. The Social Network

In October 2003, 19-year-old Harvard University student Mark Zuckerberg is dumped by his girlfriend Erica Albright. Returning to his dorm, Zuckerberg writes an insulting entry about Albright on his LiveJournal blog and then creates a campus website called Facemash by hacking into college databases to steal photos of female students, then allowing site visitors to rate their attractiveness. After traffic to the site crashes parts of Harvard’s computer network, Zuckerberg is given six months of academic probation. However, Facemash’s popularity attracts the attention of Harvard upperclassmen and twins Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss and their business partner Divya Narendra. The trio invites Zuckerberg to work on Harvard Connection, a social network featuring the exclusive nature of Harvard students and aimed at dating.

9. Pirates of the Silicon Valley

Pirates of Silicon Valley is an original 1999 American made for television biographical drama film, directed by Martyn Burke and starring Noah Wyle as Steve Jobs and Anthony Michael Hall as Bill Gates. Spanning the years 1971–1997 and based on Paul Freiberger and Michael Swaine’s 1984 book Fire in the Valley: The Making of the Personal Computer, it explores the impact of the rivalry between Jobs (Apple Computer) and Gates (Microsoft) on the development of the personal computer.

10. Lord of War

Lord of War is a 2005 crime drama written, produced, and directed by Andrew Niccol, and co-produced by and starring Nicolas Cage. It was released in the United States on September 16, 2005, with the DVD following on January 17, 2006 and the Blu-ray Disc on July 27, 2006. Cage plays an illegal arms dealer, inspired by the stories of several real-life arms dealers and smugglers. The film was officially endorsed by the human rights group Amnesty International for highlighting the arms trafficking by the international arms industry.

11. 99 Francs

The film is a satire on the modern advertisement business. The plot mainly concerns the story of a commercial advertisement designer, Octave Parango (Jean Dujardin), who has an easy-going, highly paid job, and an active free life mainly consisting of drugs and random one-time sexual relationships. However, he starts growing weary of his job, and after having his first ever long-time relationship with fellow worker Sophie (Vahina Giocante) fail miserably, he organises a revolt against the advertisement business and his own life. 99 Francs (the title symbolises the worth of a paperback) is two separate stories: a dark, hallucinatory descent into a hell of drugs and self-indulgence, and a rather chirpy alternative ending to which the audience is invited as “a panel for an experiment”. In the first, Octave plunges to his death after killing people with a car under the influence of drugs, killing the office hamster and causing the suicide of his best friend and his lover. In the second, Octave gives the world of advertising and capitalism the middle finger and escapes to a tropical paradise where he is joined by his lover and their child in “the best of worlds”. Whatever, the film closes with an announcement that 10% of the increasing millions invested in advertising every year would be sufficient to end famine.

12. Love & Other Drugs

In 1996, Jamie Randall is fired from a Pittsburgh electronics store for having sex with his manager’s girlfriend. His wealthy brother Josh announces at the dinner table at their parents’ house that he has found Jamie a job as a pharmaceutical sales representative. After attending a Pfizer training program where he has sex with the instructor, Jamie goes to work for the company and tries to get doctors to prescribe Zoloft and Zithromax. He is rebuffed, much to the dismay of his regional manager, Bruce, who sees Jamie as his ticket to the “big leagues” of Chicago. Bruce says if Jamie can get Dr. Knight to prescribe Zoloft instead of Prozac, other doctors will follow his lead. Jamie tries to get access to Dr. Knight by hitting on his female employees until, exasperated, Dr. Knight unethically permits him to observe him at work, during which time he accidentally sees a disrobing patient, Maggie Murdock, who suffers from early onset Parkinson’s disease.

13. The Pursuit of Happyness

In 1981, San Francisco salesman Chris Gardner invests his entire life savings in portable bone density scanners, which he demonstrates to doctors and pitches as a handy quantum leap over standard X-rays. The scanners play a vital role in his life. While he is able to sell most of them, the time lag between the sales and his growing financial demands enrage his already bitter and alienated wife Linda, who works as a hotel maid. The financial instability increasingly erodes their marriage, in spite of them caring for Christopher Jr., their soon-to-be five-year-old son.

4. Suckers

Bobby (played by Louis Mandylor) is nice-guy looking for work. He also owes a lot of money to these loan sharks, Chad and Everett. One day he walks into Southside Motors in L.A., and takes a job as a car sales man. This is where it all happens and he enters into the shady world of car sales. The dealership manager (played by Daniel Benzali) is a bald headed bully who has no qualms about screwing the customer. Unfortunately for Bobby, he doesn’t have the knack for screwing the customers.Things are also complicated when the loan sharks come to collect money that Bobby owes them.

15. The Wolf Of Wall Street

In 1987, Jordan Belfort procures a job as a Wall Street stockbroker for L.F. Rothschild, employed under Mark Hanna, who quickly entices him with the sex and drugs fueled stockbroker culture and passes on his idea that a stockbroker’s only goal is to make money for himself. Jordan soon finds his career terminated following Black Monday and takes a job at a boiler room brokerage firm on Long Island that specializes in penny stocks. Thanks to his aggressive pitching style and the high commissions, Jordan makes a small fortune.

If you haven’t yet, just go and watch them!

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.